Alamance neighborhoods experience a mix of growth and loss according to census data

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Alamance County has seen its population increase 6.3% in recent years, reflecting a faster growth rate than North Carolina and the US average.

While some areas of the county have seen significant inflows, others have seen significant population losses.

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Between 2014 and 2019, the population of Alamance County increased by 6.3% to 163,324. At the same time, the population of North Carolina increased by 5.3 percent and the total population of the states. United rose 3.4 percent.

Alamance County has 36 census tracts with two to six block groups each, for a total of 113 unique areas spread across the American Community Survey. Seventy of these regions experienced growth, while 43 saw their populations decline during this five-year period.

The top five regions in Alamance County that have experienced the strongest growth are:

  • Block group 3, census tract 210, which is in downtown Graham, just northeast of Court Square, saw its population increase by 89.4%;
  • Block group 2, census tract 212.05, which is in Mebane and along South 8th Street, saw its population increase by 71.3 percent;
  • Block group 1, census tract 217.02, which is at Elon and along East Haggard Avenue in the heart of the university campus, saw its population increase by 69.4%;
  • Block group 3, census tract 217.02, which is also in Elon between University Drive and South Williamson Avenue, saw its population increase by 68.3 percent; and,
  • Block group 3, census tract 202, which is in Burlington north of East Webb Avenue to North Mebane Street, saw its population increase by 66.8 percent.

On the flip side, areas that have seen the greatest percentage of population decline include:

  • Block group 3, census tract 207.01, which is in Burlington and is bordered by Huffman Mill Road, South Mebane Street and the Freeway, saw a 45.6 percent decrease in population;
  • Block group 1, census tract 211.01, which is in the eastern part of Graham, from Graham Road to Town Branch Road, saw a 44.9 percent decrease in population;
  • Block group 5, census tract 204, which is in North Burlington from Sharpe Road to Apple Street and Lakeside Avenue to Rauhut Street, saw a 37.2 percent decrease in population;
  • Block group 2, census tract 205.02, which is in Burlington from West Webb Avenue to North Fisher Street and from Elmira Street to Lakeside Avenue, saw a 36.1 percent decrease in population; and,
  • Block group 1, census tract 212.06, which is east of Haw River, from Trollingwood Road to East Main Street, saw a 34.8 percent decrease in population.

The American Community Survey includes a map reflecting these growth rates. Many growing areas line the highway in the county’s central corridor with a few exceptions, while more rural areas at the northern and southern ends of the county have seen their populations decline.

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Elizabeth Pattman is the hot topics reporter for The Times-News in Burlington, covering business, COVID-19 and all the trends. Contact Elizabeth (she) at epattman@gannett.com. I’m also available on social media @EPattmanTN on Twitter or @burlingtontimesnews on Instagram.


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