Legal process – Loro Dinapoli http://lorodinapoli.org/ Tue, 17 May 2022 12:20:39 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 http://lorodinapoli.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-06T154208.998-150x150.png Legal process – Loro Dinapoli http://lorodinapoli.org/ 32 32 How climate law can help prevent the next pandemic http://lorodinapoli.org/how-climate-law-can-help-prevent-the-next-pandemic/ Tue, 17 May 2022 12:15:35 +0000 http://lorodinapoli.org/how-climate-law-can-help-prevent-the-next-pandemic/ Two of the greatest crises facing humanity – pandemics and climate change – are closely linked. Climate change increases many health risks, including the likelihood of new viruses spreading and causing dangerous epidemics. But although efforts to control climate change are backed by a web of international treaties and legal agreements, these tools have not […]]]>

Two of the greatest crises facing humanity – pandemics and climate change – are closely linked. Climate change increases many health risks, including the likelihood of new viruses spreading and causing dangerous epidemics. But although efforts to control climate change are backed by a web of international treaties and legal agreements, these tools have not been fully applied to global health. Those gathering for the World Health Assembly in Geneva later this month should push for that to change.

I am a lawyer and researcher specializing in the governance of pandemics and climate change. I have seen the development of international laws produce political commitments such as national emissions targets. Since 1992, a network of treaties, including the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), has established protocols for reaching consensus. Progress has been slow, but real.

This is illustrated by the 2015 Paris Agreement. Yes, it is insufficient: countries set their own non-binding targets. Nevertheless, presidents and prime ministers have pledged to reduce emissions and are now publicly accountable. Countries have also explicitly recognized that climate change (such as extreme heat, droughts and floods) can undermine the right to health by contributing to crop failures, infectious diseases and other disasters. The agreement captured the political momentum to get countries to make important commitments that are growing over time.

Pandemics lack any equivalent scaffolding to support complex global cooperation. The International Health Regulations, which were last overhauled in 2005, have significant shortcomings. Although they are legally binding, their enforcement is weak and they are widely ignored. The global health community, often loath to appear “political,” has underutilized the potential of international law to set standards for compliance.

In 2021, member states of the World Health Organization established a formal negotiating body to explore international law in pandemic prevention, preparedness and response. When he asked for comment last month, I made two points. First, this pandemic law should engage countries’ existing legal obligations in recognizing how climate change will exacerbate epidemics. Second, that a pandemic treaty could be modeled on climate law to make countries transparent and accountable for delivering on commitments. The details – from virus monitoring, information sharing, etc. – are less urgent than the process, with one exception. Pandemic law should learn from the failures of climate law and ensure that attention is paid to justice and equity between and within countries.

The UNFCCC was written to spur action. A framework convention is a treaty that sets out high-level legally binding principles and obligations to encourage faster negotiation and adoption. It can instill political momentum into national commitments, including governance structures and processes. It also enables protocols, such as the Kyoto Protocol or the Paris Agreement, that can be refined in parallel or over time, so that negotiators can build on past progress and create detailed obligations for specific issues, such as technology transfer or equitable distribution of vaccines.

The power of the UNFCCC lies in how it establishes institutions and processes to support collective action and accountability. The Conferences of the Parties (COP) are the clearest example of this. Remember how COP26 in Glasgow last year captured the world’s attention and spurred leaders to set bigger goals. COPs exist to assess, clarify and reiterate obligations. Non-governmental organizations, advocacy organizations and other parts of civil society use COPs to hold governments to account. Citizens can also hold governments to account if they don’t take enough action, as is the case with climate class action lawsuits in more than 35 countries. Indeed, the fact that there are so many powerful global public health organizations could make these mechanisms more powerful.

The key is not to take any single treaty, agreement or policy as the outcome – there have been so many disappointments. We should examine how these mechanisms work together. Funding and capacity building are essential for effectiveness under the UNFCCC, the Paris Agreement and COP decisions. Accountability and transparency are also crucial. Pandemic law must, for example, protect the rights of whistleblowers, including health workers.

Better than punitive measures, which can erode cooperation, there are mechanisms to encourage compliance. For example, the compliance committee established by the Paris Agreement helps countries make progress on emissions targets by identifying non-compliance, providing expert advice on requirements and timelines, and enforcing plans. .

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change produces regular reports that provide reliable updates and syntheses of available data. Similarly, an effective pandemic treaty would establish an independent process for collecting and synthesizing scientific evidence for preparedness and response. This would guide investments in capacity building and technology development, and inform outbreak mitigation policies.

International climate legislation is far from sufficient: countries have not yet reduced their emissions enough to avoid a hotter and sicker world. But they enabled climate action. Any pandemic treaty will be imperfect. But taking tough, imperfect steps is the only way to build momentum.

Competing interests

The author declares no competing interests.

]]>
A Roe reversal v. Wade could put fertility clinics at the center of the fight against abortion http://lorodinapoli.org/a-roe-reversal-v-wade-could-put-fertility-clinics-at-the-center-of-the-fight-against-abortion/ Wed, 11 May 2022 12:03:00 +0000 http://lorodinapoli.org/a-roe-reversal-v-wade-could-put-fertility-clinics-at-the-center-of-the-fight-against-abortion/ In interviews with CNN, doctors who work in the field of fertility and academics who study the legal landscape surrounding it, say there is serious uncertainty — both about how fertility laws Abortion rights already in effect will be interpreted and how local lawmakers and prosecutors might seek to push the boundaries, freed from precedents […]]]>

In interviews with CNN, doctors who work in the field of fertility and academics who study the legal landscape surrounding it, say there is serious uncertainty — both about how fertility laws Abortion rights already in effect will be interpreted and how local lawmakers and prosecutors might seek to push the boundaries, freed from precedents that have effectively shielded the fertility process from government interference. This lack of clarity, it is feared, will affect the treatments doctors are prepared to offer IVF patients and the decisions people will have to make about how to continue growing their families.

According to Seema Mohapatra, a law professor at SMU Dedman, there are several stages of the fertility process that — without the current Supreme Court legal protections for the right to abortion, which have been in place for 49 years — could be vulnerable to government interference. Law school specializing in assisted reproduction.

“It really has these practical effects where, due to the lack of protection from Roe v. Wade and Planned Parenthood v. Casey, you may not be able to have that wanted child that you paid all that money for and you’re going to through this physical process in order to have,” she said.

About 2 in 100 children born in the United States are conceived through IVF, according to published data by the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“We’re hanging on the wind right now,” a Midwestern reproductive endocrinologist told CNN of the looming uncertainty. The doctor spoke on condition of anonymity due to the sensitive nature of their practice and the uncertain future of procedures like IVF in their condition.

The focus is on how some states with anti-abortion laws, such as Tennessee, Arkansas and Kentuckyalready define embryos as unborn children at the time of fertilization – a position that may provide a starting point for lawmakers to interfere with the IVF process.

“States have already taken the liberty of having these broad definitions. They just couldn’t really apply them the way they wanted because Roe and Casey were getting in the way,” said the Rutgers Law School dean and Professor Kimberly. Mutcherson, referring to the 1973 and 1992 Supreme Court abortion precedents. But if Roe and Casey are struck down, Mutcherson said, it would effectively be the Supreme Court saying, “Do what you want to do, declare! ”

“And it’s a pretty wild place,” she said.

In Louisiana, lawmakers are already taking a bold direction. Lawmakers have advanced a bill last week, which would criminalize abortion in the state and provide constitutional rights to “all unborn children from the time of fertilization.” Notably, this bill would remove language from current Louisiana law that refers to “implantation” of the fertilized egg before it is considered a person.

“A bill like the one being proposed in Louisiana would ban IVF in that state, and that’s something we’re very concerned about,” Dr. Natalie Crawford of FORA Fertility in Austin, Texas told CNN. “We don’t think people understand the implications of some of these bills.”

“It’s a design process, not a moment”

When an individual or couple undergoes the IVF process, the work begins in a lab, where a sperm fertilizes an egg after weeks of preparation. The goal is to eventually transfer a healthy embryo into a person’s uterus. But first, the embryo must reach the blastocyst stage, which usually occurs between five and seven days after fertilization.

“It’s a design process,” the Midwestern doctor said. “Not for a moment.”

IVF clinics usually use the genetic material of two people to create multiple embryos because they don’t know which ones will develop at the right stage or which ones will result in a successful pregnancy.

“The goal is usually to make as many embryos as possible,” explained the doctor. “That’s because, on average, half of all embryos are chromosomally abnormal.” These abnormalities can lead to conditions such as Down syndrome and trisomy 18 or can prevent the embryo from growing into a healthy pregnancy. Clinics and/or clients usually choose to discard them rather than implant them.

This creation of multiple embryos is where IVF clinics see potential legal issues on the horizon. If a state defines an unborn child as existing at the time of fertilization, clinics could violate the law by rejecting chromosomally abnormal embryos or terminating a pregnancy where multiple embryos were implanted.

“The odds of a successful IVF cycle aren’t that high, so doctors often implant multiple embryos to maximize the chance that at least one pregnancy will come to term,” said Mary Ziegler, Harvard visiting law professor. who writes extensively on abortion issues. “Sometimes to maximize the chances of a pregnancy going to term, some of those pregnancies are terminated. A lot of people in the anti-abortion movement look at this and say it’s abortion.”

People undergoing IVF can also choose to freeze unused embryos for later use, or for backup if a pregnancy ultimately fails.

“There are always extra embryos,” Mohapatra said. “You don’t know if it’s going to take the first cycle.”

Crawford posted a long thread on Twitter highlighting how restrictive abortion laws in several states could be detrimental to IVF, explaining that the process of “egg fertilization, embryo freezing, embryo testing and transfer/discarding embryos…is essential for safe and accessible access and effective IVF care.” Crawford continued, “The fear is that when Roe is overthrown then the states individually decide their position on this issue…if life legally begins at fertilization – then we are limited in the above technology.”

“What do I tell these patients?

There is no clear indication at this point whether individual state legislatures will expand their abortion bans to apply explicitly to the IVF process. But the ambiguity in how future abortion bans might be interpreted — especially in a legal landscape where enforcement decisions might be made by individual prosecutors — forces people on the ground to consider what is possible. .

“If I was in an IVF clinic, we would waste many hours debating, ‘What does this mean? What should we do? How do we protect our patients?’ “asked Katie Watson, a bioethicist and lawyer who is an associate professor at the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University. “So the deterrent effect and the limits of the intelligent practice of medicine will be important even if not not what lawmakers intended.”

The Midwestern doctor who regularly sees patients struggling with infertility says the office phone rang nonstop with people concerned about what a post-Roe world would mean for their reproductive journeys.

“The receptionists asked me, ‘What should I tell these patients?’ “said the doctor, adding that it was difficult to give a definitive answer.

Part of the unknown is fueled by the discretion that individual prosecutors will have in enforcing abortion law.

“All it takes in any case is a rogue prosecutor who wants to be aggressive in their interpretation of the law, and that could definitely create problems for those seeking IVF,” said attorney Kim Clark. principal for reproductive rights, health and justice at the progressive advocacy organization Legal Voice.

Another complicating factor is the role that civil enforcement measures — like Texas’ six-week ban, allowing individual citizens to sue anyone who facilitates a procedure prohibited by the ban — will play around the world. post-Roe.

“When you have these citizen enforcement laws, all of a sudden any random neighbor who says a blastocyst is a [person] can continue this clinic, and that’s where the cooling is phenomenal,” Watson said.

One thing is clear, however. If Roe is cleared, an array of measures targeting IVF could “much more easily move forward,” according to Judith Daar, dean of Northern Kentucky University-Salmon P. Chase College of Law, who previously chaired the committee. Ethics of the American Society. for reproductive medicine.

“Roe’s reversal could motivate and certainly pave the way for new legislation that could specifically target IVF,” she said, while suggesting that states could, for example, possibly ban genetic testing that is now routinely performed on embryos to detect abnormalities before they are implanted.

Mutcherson said fertility patients might seek to take proactive steps, such as moving their embryos out of states that are thought to be abortion-unfriendly.

“The question that really arises now is, are there things people should be doing to protect themselves before the laws start to change?” said Mutcherson.

]]>
MATCH GROUP FILES LAWSUIT AGAINST GOOGLE OVER ILLEGAL BILLING WARRANTS http://lorodinapoli.org/match-group-files-lawsuit-against-google-over-illegal-billing-warrants/ Mon, 09 May 2022 20:05:00 +0000 http://lorodinapoli.org/match-group-files-lawsuit-against-google-over-illegal-billing-warrants/ The Match Group companies are seeking injunctive relief and other appropriate remedies for the material and irreparable harm that Google’s manipulation, broken promises, and abuse of power caused DALLAS, May 9, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — The Match Group, Inc. (NASDAQ: MTCH) companies, including those that operate the dating apps Tinder®, Match®, OkCupid® and several others (collectively, […]]]>

The Match Group companies are seeking injunctive relief and other appropriate remedies for the material and irreparable harm that Google’s manipulation, broken promises, and abuse of power caused

DALLAS, May 9, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — The Match Group, Inc. (NASDAQ: MTCH) companies, including those that operate the dating apps Tinder®, Match®, OkCupid® and several others (collectively, “Match Group”), sued today Google for its strategic manipulation of markets, broken promises and abuse of power by requiring Match Group to use Google’s billing system to remain in the Google Play Store. Google’s requirement will eliminate user choice on Match Group apps and increase costs to consumers by allowing Google to charge Match Group an arbitrary and discriminatory tax of 15% on all subscriptions and up to 30% on all other in-app purchases, representing hundreds of millions of dollars in inflated “fees”, while monetizing the personal data of billions of digital app users. Google has monopolized the Google Play Store and is now abusing its power.

Read the lawsuit HERE
Learn more about the Match Group case: endthegoogletax.com

“Ten years ago, Match Group was Google’s partner. We are now its hostage,” the lawsuit alleges. Google lured app developers like Match Group to its platform with the assurance that they could offer users the choice to pay for the goods and services they want. But once it monopolized the Android app distribution market with Google Play by overlapping the most popular app developers, Google sought to ban alternative in-app payment processing platforms in order to be able to reduce almost all in-app transactions on Android. , despite users choosing Tinder billing options over Google Play Billing most of the time. Google Play Billing prevents Match Group from providing its users with the best possible experience. And Google Play Billing is inferior, lacking the capabilities Match Group’s payment systems currently offer. (Read more about this HERE).

“Earlier this year, when Google touted the benefits of ‘user choice’, I hoped they would pave the way for a fairer Google Play Store. Unfortunately, their demand that we now remove user choice the user of our apps, something we’ve been offering for years and mandating their billing system which doesn’t have many of the features that our users are used to and depend on, can only mean that they don’t don’t really care if users are being harmed in their efforts to extract their unfair share of fees from developers like us, while regulators in the US are investigating this issue and regulators overseas are calling it illegal “, said Shar Dubey, CEO of Match Group, Inc. “They control the distribution of apps on Android devices and claim that developers could successfully reach consumers on Android elsewhere. That’s like saying ‘you don’t need to take the elevator to get to the 60th floor of a building, you can always scale the outer wall. It’s not legitimate. This trial is a measure of last resort. We have tried, in good faith, to resolve these issues with Google, but their insistence and threats to remove our branded apps from the Google Play Store by June 1 left us no choice but to take legal action.”

The lawsuit, filed in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Californiaclaims that Google violated Sections 1 and 2 of the Sherman Act, the California Cartwright Act, the California Unfair Competition Act, and California tort liability through its illegal mandate requiring certain app developers to exclusively use Google Play Billing to process payments.

The Google Play Store is essentially the only viable mobile application distribution channel on smart devices running the Android operating system. Over 90% of all Android app downloads happen through the Google Play Store. Google seeks to exert this dominance over app developers and users to force them to exclusively use Google Play Billing, which levies a tax of up to 30% on each transaction. Google describes this fee as a “fee”, although it is almost 10 times higher than the fees charged by payment processors in competitive markets.

Google, in trying to attract the best apps to Google Play, had previously assured Match Group that if it enabled in-app purchases in its dating apps on Android, Match Group could use its own payment systems. Google then baited and changed by announcing that it would begin requiring all apps that sell “digital goods and services” – a term it applies arbitrarily – to exclusively use Google Play Billing despite its previous assurances to the contrary. Match Group and other developers. If Match Group does not comply with the new policy in June 1, Google has threatened to remove Match Group apps from the Google Play Store. In fact, Google has already started rejecting updates to the Match Group app that didn’t remove long-existing alternative payment systems.

By insisting on the exclusive use of Google Play Billing, Google seeks to insert itself as an intermediary between users and developers, preventing Match Group from serving its customers directly on many important issues. If Google is allowed to enforce this warrant, Match Group would suffer irreparable damage to its customer relationships, reputation, business performance, and customer base, and its users would be harmed by price increases and the monetization of their data by Google.

Google has also been sued by a coalition of 37 state attorneys general seeking to prevent the same illegal behavior, and investigations have been conducted by the US House and Senate, the European Commission and government entities in India, France, Germany, JapanGreat Britain, Australiaand South Africa, with some litigation resulting in billions of dollars in fines. (Read more about this HERE).

About Match Group
Match Group, Inc. (NASDAQ: MTCH), through its portfolio companies, is a leading provider of digital technologies designed to help people make meaningful connections. Our global brand portfolio includes Tinder®, Match®, Hinge®, Meetic®, OkCupid®, Pairs™, PlentyOfFish®, OurTime®, Azar®, Hakuna Live™, and more, each designed to increase the connection likelihood of our users with others. Through our trusted brands, we provide tailored services to meet the different preferences of our users. Our services are available in over 40 languages ​​for our users around the world.

SOURCE Match Group

]]>
Purulia weapons drop case charged with Kim Davy extradition soon? MEA says legal proceedings are ongoing http://lorodinapoli.org/purulia-weapons-drop-case-charged-with-kim-davy-extradition-soon-mea-says-legal-proceedings-are-ongoing/ Wed, 04 May 2022 05:53:00 +0000 http://lorodinapoli.org/purulia-weapons-drop-case-charged-with-kim-davy-extradition-soon-mea-says-legal-proceedings-are-ongoing/ In a major development amid Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s visit to Denmark, sources have now confirmed that India is discussing Kim Davy’s extradition with the Danish government. However, India is currently tight-lipped on the extradition case and the Ministry of External Affairs is silent on the extradition timeline. Earlier in a sensational development in the […]]]>

In a major development amid Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s visit to Denmark, sources have now confirmed that India is discussing Kim Davy’s extradition with the Danish government. However, India is currently tight-lipped on the extradition case and the Ministry of External Affairs is silent on the extradition timeline.

Earlier in a sensational development in the case, India had on February 23 secured the extradition of Danish national Kim Davy – the main conspirator of the high-profile and mysterious Purulia weapons drop case in 1995. According to sources, Denmark had also sent its teams to Calcutta to decide on the repatriation of Davy. However, the extradition has not yet been carried out and the MEA had previously confirmed that “legal proceedings are ongoing”.

Foreign Minister Vinay Kwatra on Kim Davy

Meanwhile, the new foreign minister, Vinay Kwatra. also chose not to comment on the extradition case. Speaking to the media, Kwatra said the legal process was ongoing. “The main defendant in the Purulia weapons drop case is a matter that is the subject of a legal process between the two countries and those processes are currently underway. It would be incorrect of me to comment on these processes,” he said.

It should be noted that Prime Minister Modi is the first Indian Prime Minister to undertake a bilateral visit to Denmark in the past two decades. Earlier in 2012, New Delhi cut diplomatic ties with Copenhagen in protest at the Danish government’s decision to refuse the Supreme Court’s appeal against the lower court’s ruling rejecting an extradition request for Kim Davy alias Niels Holck in India. The extradition case was also raised by India during Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen’s three-day visit to India last year.

The Purulia Gun Case

India has requested the extradition of Kim Davy from Denmark to attend court proceedings in the case of the Purulia munitions drop. The case concerns the airdrop of arms and ammunition in the Purulia district of West Bengal by an Antonov AN-26 aircraft on the night of December 17, 1995. During this period Davy was involved in humanitarian activities for the inhabitants of the region, which at that time was ruled by the Communist Party of India.

The allegations list a shipment of more than a hundred AK-47 rifles, pistols and grenades, rocket launchers and nearly thousands of cartridges. Additionally, Indian authorities have claimed Kim Davy’s involvement in arms smuggling into the country. In fact, a book written by Davy titled “They Call Me a Terrorist” contained his confession that he had dropped weapons from a plane purchased in Latvia.

(With agency contributions, Image: République)

]]>
Volunteers still cleaning up Mill Creek, a year after the floods http://lorodinapoli.org/volunteers-still-cleaning-up-mill-creek-a-year-after-the-floods/ Sat, 30 Apr 2022 20:40:00 +0000 http://lorodinapoli.org/volunteers-still-cleaning-up-mill-creek-a-year-after-the-floods/ NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WTVF) – It’s been just over a year since devastating flash flooding destroyed homes and scattered trash all around the Mill Creek area of ​​South Nashville. A year later, you still wouldn’t guess what washed ashore in Whitsett Park. “A car’s bumper, a license plate,” said volunteer Jay Renfro. “Oh, it’s an air […]]]>

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WTVF) – It’s been just over a year since devastating flash flooding destroyed homes and scattered trash all around the Mill Creek area of ​​South Nashville.

A year later, you still wouldn’t guess what washed ashore in Whitsett Park. “A car’s bumper, a license plate,” said volunteer Jay Renfro.

“Oh, it’s an air freshener, it looks like it has chloride in it,” said Kathleen Dennis, director of the Mill Creek Watershed Association. “You know it’s just sitting here seeping into our surroundings.”

Some of this trash is just everyday trash, but a large majority is from the April 2021 flood. “There was a warehouse that flooded,” Dennis said.

On April 14, 2021, flash flooding passed RJ Schinner, a restaurant supply warehouse, leaving Mill Creek masked in plastic. Hands on Nashville and other volunteer groups have worked over several weekends to get as much as possible and have made great progress. Yet, more than a year later, parts of the creek bank still appear untouched. “It feels overwhelming,” Dennis said.

That’s why Dennis brought together members of the Mill Creek Watershed Association and students from Vanderbilt University to try to make another dent in the mess. “We all really need to adopt the attitude that we are stewards of our ecosystems and we are stewards of our clean water,” Dennis said.

Already they are seeing examples of wild animals, like crayfish, being strangled by plastic. “It’s the only house this body has,” she said.

It will take many more cleanups like this to fully restore Mill Creek. “It’s a problem that people will see on the news or hear about and then let others deal with it, but it’s really our problem,” Renfro said.

But if you ask these volunteers, one less waste is one step closer to their goal. “We have so much work to do, but I think it’s valuable and we will make a difference,” Dennis said.

You may remember that RJ Schinner sued his insurance company to cover the full cost of cleaning. This process – is always linked to legal proceedings.

]]>
Analysis: Hampered by economy, Erdogan travels to Saudi Arabia to mend ties after Khashoggi U-turn http://lorodinapoli.org/analysis-hampered-by-economy-erdogan-travels-to-saudi-arabia-to-mend-ties-after-khashoggi-u-turn/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 05:41:00 +0000 http://lorodinapoli.org/analysis-hampered-by-economy-erdogan-travels-to-saudi-arabia-to-mend-ties-after-khashoggi-u-turn/ Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan attends a news conference, in Tirana, Albania January 17, 2022 REUTERS/Florion Goga Join now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com Register ANKARA, April 28 (Reuters) – Three and a half years after accusing Saudi leaders of murder and staging a show trial for the murder of journalist Jamal Khashoggi, Turkish […]]]>

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan attends a news conference, in Tirana, Albania January 17, 2022 REUTERS/Florion Goga

Join now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com

ANKARA, April 28 (Reuters) – Three and a half years after accusing Saudi leaders of murder and staging a show trial for the murder of journalist Jamal Khashoggi, Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan plans to visit the Gulf kingdom on Thursday to restore links.

Khashoggi, a critic of the Saudi government, was killed by a Saudi squad at the kingdom’s consulate in Istanbul in 2018. At the time, Erdogan accused the “highest levels” of the Saudi government of giving the orders and criticized Riyadh’s own legal process. while refusing to share evidence with them for fear of tampering.

With Turkey’s economy now facing mounting difficulties and a tough election looming, Erdogan is pushing to mend Ankara’s strained diplomatic relations. read more read more

Join now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com

The trip is the culmination of a months-long effort by Ankara to restore ties with Riyadh after Saudi Arabia imposed an unofficial boycott on Turkish imports over its stance on the Khashoggi murder, and marks a sea change on the part of Turkey.

Ankara’s decision this month to transfer its own legal case on the killing to Riyadh at the kingdom’s request has been criticized by rights groups and the opposition. But analysts and diplomats say the rapprochement was much needed given the diplomatic isolation Turkey faced.

“Turkey cannot continue this sphere of influence game that it has been pursuing since the start of the Arab Spring,” said Birol Baskan, a Turkey-based nonresident researcher at the Washington-based Middle East Institute.

Turkey has in recent years established military bases in Qatar and Somalia despite opposition from regional players. Ankara’s positions on conflicts in Syria, Libya, Nagorno-Karabakh and elsewhere, as well as the acquisition of Russian defense systems, have also caused friction with neighbors and NATO allies.

“Turkey’s aggressive foreign policy, its perception of self-aggrandizement has left it sidelined,” Baskan said, adding that economic conditions necessitated a change in approach.

Ankara describes its foreign policy as “entrepreneurial and humanitarian” and the foreign minister has called 2022 “the year of normalization” for Turkey.

The government said the decision in the Khashoggi trial was not political. Ahead of the move, Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu said conditions for “judicial cooperation” with Riyadh had not been met before, but the parties were implementing it now. He did not say what had changed. Read more

Turkey’s economy has been struggling for years and a pound crisis erupted in late 2021 due to an unorthodox monetary policy backed by Erdogan. Ankara has since been looking for ways to ease the pressure through international rapprochements.

In addition to existing currency swap agreements with China, Qatar, South Korea and the United Arab Emirates – worth a total of $28 billion – Ankara is considering a deal with Riyadh. It is also looking for investments and contracts, similar to those signed with Abu Dhabi.

On Wednesday, Turkish Finance Minister Nureddin Nebati said he discussed cooperation and exchanged views on economy, trade and investment with his Saudi counterpart.

After its foreign policy isolated it in its region and beyond, Turkey launched a charm offensive in 2020 to restore ties with distant rivals, making overtures to Egypt, the United Arab Emirates, Israel and Saudi Arabia.

Efforts with Cairo have so far yielded little progress, but normalization with the United Arab Emirates and Israel has improved trade and diplomatic relations. Relations with Riyadh had remained frosty as the kingdom sought a solution to the Khashoggi dispute.

Ankara had demanded that senior Saudi officials be prosecuted for the killing, criticizing as inadequate a Saudi verdict jailing eight people for seven to 20 years for the murder.

However, he has since greatly softened his tone to say he has no bilateral issues with Riyadh. Ankara also gave a muted response to a US intelligence report that Prince Mohammed approved of the killing.

Riyadh denied any involvement by the crown prince and rejected the report’s findings.

With the return of the Khashoggi affair to Riyadh and the overhaul of Turkey’s regional policy, analysts and officials say the political obstacles to normalizing relations with Saudi Arabia and ending the trade boycott have been lifted.

Turkish exporters believe the boycott, which cut their exports to Saudi Arabia by 98%, will now end. Neither side has yet confirmed the resumption of trade.

“There are talks between the companies now, we have also made contact with our old customers,” said Hasan Gumus, chairman of agribusiness company Yayla Agro, adding that trade would quickly return to old levels once resumed.

“The crisis Turkey had with Saudi Arabia is now over,” said Baskan of the Middle East Institute.

“Erdogan could get capital and state contracts. This is a major foreign policy reversal, but it will be good for Turkey.”

Join now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com

Written by Tuvan Gumrukcu; Additional reporting by Nevzat Devranoglu and Ceyda Caglayan; Editing by Ali Kucukgocmen, Daren Butler and Toby Chopra

Our standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

]]>
HB 2471 | Special expedited public registration process for elected officials http://lorodinapoli.org/hb-2471-special-expedited-public-registration-process-for-elected-officials/ Mon, 25 Apr 2022 00:05:21 +0000 http://lorodinapoli.org/hb-2471-special-expedited-public-registration-process-for-elected-officials/ Session: 2021-2022 Position of the ACLU-PA: Opposes HB 2471 create an exception to require an expedited process for open case requests and appeals made by elected officials. HB 2471 would require public agencies to respond to a right-to-know request by a public official within five days of the request. If the agency denies the request […]]]>

Session: 2021-2022

Position of the ACLU-PA: Opposes

HB 2471 create an exception to require an expedited process for open case requests and appeals made by elected officials. HB 2471 would require public agencies to respond to a right-to-know request by a public official within five days of the request. If the agency denies the request for documents, the public official can appeal to the State Office for Open Documents, which must decide on the appeal within five days. Indeed, this bill would shorten the time for requests for records and appeals…only by/for elected officials—from 65 days to as little as 10 days.

The ACLU-PA opposes HB 2471 for the following reasons:

  • It is unclear what problem this bill is trying to solve. In his note, the bill’s sponsor recounts a long delay in getting a response after appealing a Liquor Control Board’s denial of his Right to Know (RTK) request. But the appeal went all the way to the PA Supreme Court, meaning the ‘delay’ was at least in part due to the time it took for the appeal to make its way through the courts. courts, not the Office of Open Records.
  • HB 2471 would require Office of Open Records (OOR) appeals officers to make decisions within five days of filing an appeal—5 calendar days, no working days. This is an impractical and unwise time limit, as the agency to whom the request was made has the right to respond to the appeal. In addition, any other parties whose privacy or data interests may also be at stake are consulted. Accordingly, HB 2471 not only expects the OOR to weigh all legal arguments within 5 days, but also expects each agency/party involved in an appeal to comply with the expedited timeframe as well. Assuming this delay is even possible, HB 2471 would virtually guarantee sloppy, incomplete, and thoughtless appeal decisions.
  • There is no provision in HB 2471 to prevent a legislator from submitting an RTK request on behalf of someone else (a voter or other requester) in order to take advantage of the expedited process for receiving a response to a request and /or a call.
  • Finally, there is no justifiable reason in the public interest to give elected officials a special preference to receive RTK calls and/or request responses. Lawmakers have better tools to obtain and access public information and, as such, are already working at an advantage over other Pennsylvanians.
]]>
Managing workplace change through team building http://lorodinapoli.org/managing-workplace-change-through-team-building/ Thu, 21 Apr 2022 14:14:58 +0000 http://lorodinapoli.org/managing-workplace-change-through-team-building/ “Change is the only constant in life,” said the Greek philosopher Heraclitus. In recent years, this is a truth that has become increasingly real for the legal profession. Digital disruption, rising customer expectations and pressure on fees were already reshaping traditional norms before the pandemic forced sweeping and rapid change and showed it was possible. […]]]>

“Change is the only constant in life,” said the Greek philosopher Heraclitus. In recent years, this is a truth that has become increasingly real for the legal profession. Digital disruption, rising customer expectations and pressure on fees were already reshaping traditional norms before the pandemic forced sweeping and rapid change and showed it was possible.

Today, change can take many forms, such as adapting to changing economic or political drivers, responding to changing regulatory or market challenges, implementing new internal systems, or response to a “black swan” event. Suppose change is a normal and natural feature of today’s legal landscape. How can law firms and legal professionals best manage it, transforming it from a threat to an opportunity and maximizing the chances of success for change initiatives?

Assess your team’s appetite for workplace change

There is a feeling that Covid-19 has changed the rules of engagement, in terms of managing change, but whether the change is permanent remains to be seen. As companies stalled, no set playbooks or official guidelines covered the new ways of working, suddenly imposed on everyone. Rather than carefully planning change and leading it from the top, people just had to adapt, try new things, and see what worked.

This creativity was liberating and opened the door to accomplishments that might not have happened otherwise or that would have taken much longer to materialize, such as implementing new technologies or working differently. From now on, this new state of mind could mix with traditional approaches: mix experimentation with rigour. Ideally, the idea that everyone is involved in bringing about change will lead to a more collaborative culture of learning and sharing ideas, advice, and improved practices over the long term.

After a prolonged episode as physically, emotionally and mentally draining as the pandemic, the first thing to do is to assess the resilience of your organization and whether your staff has the energy and appetite to undertake a major change initiative.

“If there is a platform on fire, obviously you have to act. If not, ask yourself: why do this now? says Caroline White-Robinson, Head of Business Development and Learning & Development at Shoosmiths. “If you’re doing a ‘one-time survey’ (to gauge employee sentiment and drive engagement), don’t just ask questions about work; consider what is happening in people’s lives. Understand your people, not just your organizational needs.

Cultural Considerations for Business Change

This strategy is important because any major change initiative requires energy, investment and enthusiasm from everyone involved. If you decide to embark on this type of project, one of the biggest challenges is getting people on board and ensuring the right culture exists to embrace change. This means articulating the need and the vision for change, then getting staff to support it personally, for example, because they can see how it will make their job easier. Addressing issues such as the impact of change on perceived status, sense of certainty, sense of autonomy, relationships, and ideas about fairness in the workplace (called the SCARF model) can effectively address concerns and reassure people of the benefits.

“We often assume that people are like chess pieces that we can move, but sometimes they react in unexpected ways,” says Ian Rodwell, Head of Customer Insights and Learning at Linklaters. Offering “carrots” can help generate buy-in, but check that the incentives encourage good behavior or develop valuable contributions. Likewise, be careful with “sticks”: putting something in context to explain why someone should do something is probably more effective than simply forcing them to do it.

High-level support for the change initiative is vital, but so is the presence of champions on the ground, either in a centralized project team or through individuals acting as sponsors within groups. existing. Whoever is leading the charge needs to have credibility so that people know they have their best interests at heart. Resource allocations should ensure that those responsible for driving the change can focus on and prioritize it. Otherwise, it could be derailed by day-to-day operational necessities. It is also important to ensure that the middle frames do not experience too much pressure from above and resistance from below.

Create a roadmap for team alignment

Before you begin, be clear about what needs to change and why. This mapping process is much more difficult than it looks. Too often, insufficient consideration is given to the need for change, the problem it will solve, the understanding of the issues at stake, and the value such change brings. Once you know the “why”, you can focus on the “how”.

There are many different change management models. “The danger is that people take one approach and apply it to every initiative,” Rodwell warns. “It’s always contextual: some things work in some scenarios but not in others.” Having the right framework and the right processes is essential to ensure that the inputs produce the desired results.

“Think about the end goal and then you can figure out what the journey is like,” says Helen Lowe, head of legal operations at easyJet. “In the legal profession, it’s not necessarily about making a ‘big bang’ change. It’s easy to think that a shiny new technology will make a difference, but this industry has traditionally been averse to risk and change. Take baby steps. But keep up the pace. It’s fine to let the pioneers go first and fail quickly, but don’t fall too far behind the leading edge.

Post-Covid, the rationale and pathways for change are more nuanced than ever. People can be more open-minded and adaptable, but keep the personal and professional pressures of staff in mind and balance them with the business imperatives of the company. It’s about making the right changes for the right reasons and using the right structures to get the best results. It’s a big challenge, even in the best of times.

Tips for a Successful Change Management Program Through Team Engagement

  • Carefully assess the need and appetite for change.
  • Clearly communicate the rationale and vision for the change to minimize resistance.
  • Engage people early, so they become ambassadors, not detractors.
  • Put in place the right structures to get the right results.
  • Make sure everyone is working as a team towards a common goal.
  • Allocate resources to prioritize change.
  • Set expectations and maintain momentum.

Keep colleagues informed, communicate easily, collaborate on documents, and manage tasks with HighQ. Learn more with these customer testimonials.

]]>
Live updates: Greece says it seized Russian tanker under EU sanctions rules http://lorodinapoli.org/live-updates-greece-says-it-seized-russian-tanker-under-eu-sanctions-rules/ Tue, 19 Apr 2022 13:53:17 +0000 http://lorodinapoli.org/live-updates-greece-says-it-seized-russian-tanker-under-eu-sanctions-rules/ European stocks opened lower after Russia launched a new offensive in Ukraine while the World Bank cut its forecast for global growth, citing the inflationary effects of the war. The Stoxx 600 stock index fell 0.7% in early trading on Tuesday, while London’s FTSE 100 edged down 0.1% and Germany’s Xetra Dax 0.5%. In Asia, […]]]>

European stocks opened lower after Russia launched a new offensive in Ukraine while the World Bank cut its forecast for global growth, citing the inflationary effects of the war.

The Stoxx 600 stock index fell 0.7% in early trading on Tuesday, while London’s FTSE 100 edged down 0.1% and Germany’s Xetra Dax 0.5%. In Asia, Hong Kong’s Hang Seng stock index fell 2.2% on concerns over global growth combined with a move by Chinese authorities to tighten regulations on the lucrative live streaming industry. country.

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky said on Monday, as major European markets were closed for the Easter holiday, that Russia had concentrated a “significant part” of its forces in the eastern border region of Donbass. The World Bank has lowered its forecast for global economic growth from 4.1% to 3.2% and foresees a contraction in Europe, which is vulnerable to sanctions against Russia and supply chain disruptions driving prices higher. energy and food.

The price of gold, which hit a one-month high on Monday as concerns over economic growth prompted investors to buy the safe-haven asset, edged down 0.2% in early European trading at $1,974 per troy ounce.

Brent crude oil fell 0.3% to $112.8 a barrel, after rallying in the past four days.

Chinese tech stocks fell on Tuesday as markets reopened after news that Beijing had tightened regulations on the country’s live-streaming industry.

The Hang Seng Tech index, which tracks Hong Kong-listed technology groups, fell 3.5%, with notable losses for video platforms Bilibili, which lost up to 11%, and Kuaishou, which fell by 5.5%.

Investors were expecting a week of corporate earnings on Tuesday looking for clues about how the business world was grappling with inflation and an uncertain growth outlook. Streaming group Netflix will release quarterly figures later on Tuesday, with analysts watching to see if the trend of UK households canceling subscriptions to cope with rising costs of living is being replicated elsewhere.

For more market news, click here.

]]>
Tavleen Singh writes: Bulldozing justice in Khargone http://lorodinapoli.org/tavleen-singh-writes-bulldozing-justice-in-khargone/ Sun, 17 Apr 2022 03:10:27 +0000 http://lorodinapoli.org/tavleen-singh-writes-bulldozing-justice-in-khargone/ Let me start with a question. Would it be fair that the homes of police officers and law and order officials in khargon have their houses bulldozed? I ask the question because when violence breaks out in a public place, it is because the local administration is failing and must be held accountable. But instead […]]]>

Let me start with a question. Would it be fair that the homes of police officers and law and order officials in khargon have their houses bulldozed? I ask the question because when violence breaks out in a public place, it is because the local administration is failing and must be held accountable. But instead of the torturous process of commissions of inquiry that take decades to deliver their verdict, wouldn’t it be better to punish officials without due process?

It is with this question in mind that we must look at the demolition of the homes and properties of those accused of rioting in Khargone. What happened was outrageous because it was a violation of the fundamental principles that govern the rule of law, but public outrage has been subdued by the voices of those who believe it serves the law of Muslims.

On social media, I heard jubilant “new” Indians celebrating what happened in Khargone. I engaged with them to emphasize that without the rule of law, democratic countries become autocracies and what prevails is the law of the jungle. And the response was that if the Chief Minister of Madhya Pradesh had waited to punish the rioters through due legal process, they would have gone unpunished for years. It’s true. And there’s a solution that’s so obvious that I feel silly repeating it here, but it clearly needs repeating.

The reason the justice system moves so slowly is that it is broken and badly in need of fixing. There are obvious reforms that can be made without effort. The most necessary of these, in my opinion, is to remove the ridiculous procedures that have existed since colonial times. An example that immediately comes to mind is that of Aryan Khan. The day he was released on bail, he could have been released from court in another country immediately. But not in India. Here he was taken back to the cell in which he was locked up for a month and had to wait another two days for the procedures for his release to be completed. Why do these procedures exist?

Why does it take the courts 20 years of deliberation before punishing those responsible for the bombings that killed nearly 300 people in Mumbai in 1993? Why do judges need to write short novels to render their judgements? Why do the police need thousands of words to lay charges that could be made in a few paragraphs? Why do lawyers succeed in delaying trials? Why is there no deadline for the end of trials? These are just some of the questions that need urgent answers, but the answer cannot be to establish the law of the jungle instead of the rule of law.

What we saw in Khargone was the law of the jungle. Madhya Pradesh’s home minister has defended what happened on the grounds that those who throw stones will have their homes reduced to stone. Well, what would he say to the old lady whose picture made the front page of this newspaper last week? Hasina Fakhroo is in her 60s and clearly too old to be a riot, but her house was reduced to rubble before she could prove it was built under the Pradhan Mantri Awas Yojana.

The list of cases in which people have been punished without due process is long, and the list does not begin with the coming to power of Narendra Modi as the Congress Party would have us believe. An example of the supposedly benign era of Congress is that of Lalit Modi. All the cases that have been brought against him have been dismissed by the courts, but he was kicked out of India following a disgraceful media trial in which those responsible for upholding the rule of law played a villain role. Most recently, this happened in the Sushant Singh Rajput case where the media was manipulated by calculated leaks to turn his suicide into a murder case. A young woman’s life was destroyed by TV presenters who found her guilty on prime time. Should these anchors have their homes bulldozed? When should we stop using bulldozers?

Once we give the authorities the right to bulldoze the homes of suspected rioters and the right to seize the properties of suspected perpetrators, we establish the rule of the jungle. Once we allow income tax inspectors to search the homes of suspected tax evaders without proof that they evaded taxes, so do we. This is a practice that has gone on for too long.

What has changed since Narendra Modi took office is that one way or another, it is still Muslims who end up spending months in jail in bailable cases. It’s shameful that this happened to a comedian for a joke he hadn’t deciphered. It is shameful that student leaders and journalists, almost always Muslims, spend months in prison on generally dubious charges. Let us ask ourselves, then, what happens to a country in which senior political leaders and senior civil servants show utter disregard for the rule of law on the fallacious grounds that the justice process takes too long. The answer is that they are in flagrant violation of the Constitution of India, and the consequences are dire. When the rule of law is weakened, it weakens democracy because the rule of law must be sacrosanct in democratic countries.

]]>